Ivy Foundation’s Genomics-Enabled Medicine for glioblastoma viability trial

Charles S. Cobbs, MD
The Gregory Foltz, MD Endowed Director
Ben & Catherine Ivy Center for
Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment
Swedish Neuroscience Specialists

I am happy to report that The Ivy Foundation, which supports our work here in Seattle at the Ben and Catherine Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment, has funded a pilot trial based out of the Translational Genomic Research Institute (TGEN) in Phoenix. The work being done at this Institute is in collaboration with the University of California San Francisco. This 5 million-dollar project, “genomic enabled medicine and glioblastoma trial” will utilize deep sequencing of patient’s tumors to identify molecular targets for signal transduction pathways that can be targeted by currently available compounds. The plan will be to enroll 15 patients and utilize this heavy genomic technology to come up with combinatorial therapies that will hopefully be able to block multiple pathways at once which are contributing to tumor growth in these patients. Clearly, the oncology community has finally woken up to the fact that single therapies given one at a time cannot eradicate complex tumors such as glioblastoma. It is becoming more evident that these tumors are incredibly adept at evasive strategies for circumventing any one given shut door. Therefore, if one could simultaneously shut multiple doors and block any exit strategy for the tumor, there may be much higher likelihood of success.

The Ivy Foundation states that “to get new treatments to patients as quickly as possible, this five-year study will include a feasibility study involving up to 30 patients, followed by Phase II clinical trials with as many as 70 patients. TGen is teaming with the Ivy Early Phase Clinical Trials Consortium that includes: University of California, San Francisco; University of California, Los Angeles; the MD Anderson Cancer Center; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; University of Utah; and the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center.
The results of these clinical trials should not only help the patients who join them, but also provide the data needed for FDA approval and availability of new drugs that could benefit tens of thousands of brain cancer patients in the future.”

The Ivy Foundation should be congratulated for taking this bold step in moving the field forward by combining complex genomic analysis, bioinformatics and combination therapies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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8 comments:

  1. This is very exciting news I was diagnosed with GBM last October went through surgery chemo/ radiation and still no sign of tumor I know GBM is aggressive so if / when it returns I will be looking for this:)

    1. Shannon,

      Thank you for your comment. Please keep following our blogs, as we are constantly posting updates to brain cancer clinical trials and treatment options as well as caregiver support information, etc…

      Thank you again for visiting BrainCancer.org and we wish you many clean and stable MRI’s!

      Maria Barrett-BrainCancer.org

  2. I had brain surgery on 12/17/2014 and had a tumor removed from my left temporal mass. I was diagnosed with giant cell gloiblastoma. The good news is that the entire tumor was removed and there was no brain damage. The bad news is that there is a low survival rate. I started radiation on Jan 12 and will continue until Feb 20. I am taking 120 mg of temozolomide for 6 weeks. I am being treated at the Disney Cancer Center at Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, CA. I also went to UCLA for a second opinion and was advised to do this same treatment. After treatment I am interested in possible clinical trials or other treatment ideas. I want to stay in remission and keep a positive attitude. I am open to any suggestions and ideas. I would also love to be updated on the newest information and research. And of course I want to survive. I am married, I am a mother of three children and it turns out that my brother lives near Seattle. I look forward to your reply.

    1. Hello Nancy,

      We have just uncovered your email in thousands of spam messages/emails we receive on our website and apologize for the delay in seeing this.
      We hope you are doing well. Have you been able to participate in any clinical trials? Let us know how you are doing.

      Take care,

      Maria Barrett
      BrainCancer.org

  3. I was diagnosed gbm4 march 18 2015. It is located in the right temporal lobe and deemed inoperable. I am 55 year old male with no health problems prior to this. I started radiation and temedor 140 mg April 8 2015. How do I get on a list to be considered for clinical trials with Dr Cobb? My Chemo/ radiation is complete May 26 2015

    1. Hello Jim,

      Please contact the Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment if you’d like to set up an appointment to meet with one of our Neuro-Oncologists at 206-320-2300. That would be the first step in getting information on our clinical trials and your eligibility to participate.

      We hope you are doing well and apologize for the delay in getting back to you. Your message got lost in all of the spam replies we get thousands of, unfortunately.

      Take care,

      Maria Barrett
      BrainCancer.org

  4. my husband has GBM4 left frontal 4months ago no chance for operation and 1 year of life left we just finish 15 days of radiation and he has something called (methylated)this is and (MGMT from Tumor Biopsy)
    He has lost some speech and has slow movement and slow walking but understand everting in his mine ….can you help us with any information if he can get a better chance of surviving …..is your study help people to life longer? Please we need something to give as hope !!

    1. Maria,

      Thank you for reaching out to us. I am going to share some links for two videos we did on Methylated and Umethylated MGMT. This will be very helpful to you in understanding what exactly a Methlyated MGMT GBM brain tumor is.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-KQsLJcGKU
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ypp-VQEp42Y

      We are very sorry about your husband’s diagnosis. GBM is a difficult diagnosis. We encourage all patients to be seen at Advanced Brain Tumor Centers and get 2nd and sometimes even 3rd opinions on treatment plans. Where is your husband being seen at currently?

      Thank you,

      Maria Barrett
      BrainCancer.org

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