• Benign vs. Malignant

    Tumors fall into two main categories, benign and malignant. Benign tumors are typically formed by slow growing cells that rarely spread. Although they can press on and damage nearby normal tissue, benign tumors are much less dangerous than malignant tumors. However, they can be life-threatening if they endanger vital brain centers. Often benign tumors can be cured with surgery alone. However, overtime, some benign tumors can become malignant. Malignant brain tumors, on the other hand, are formed by cells that typically grow quickly and are capable of invading nearby tissues and spreading to other parts of the body. Their tendencies to invade and spread make these tumors much more dangerous. Malignant tumors of the brain often spread to other parts of the central nervous system. Only relatively few spread to other parts of the body.